Sunday, August 30, 2009

More Thoughts on MLB Pitching Statistics

In the National League, the elongated double switch shows again why pitching statistics are quite poorly attributed. ;A traditional double switch involves the manager inserting a position player into the game ;for the current pitcher and a new pitcher for a position player--typically one who just made an out, so that the new pitcher won't be batting for nearly a full trip through the lineup.

However, this same basic maneuver can also occur by simply pinch-hitting for the pitcher while on offense and then placing the pitcher in for whichever player makes the last out of the inning. ;If the team takes the lead (and subsequently does not lose it), the just-substituted-for pitcher gets credited with the win.

The problem is this: if this scenario occurs before the 5th inning, the starting pitcher cannot get the win, so it'll almost certainly be the next guy who pitches that will get the win. ;But given that a position player is the opne who was inserted for the pitcher, why wouldn't

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